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Can reducing inflammation help you to lower the risk of chronic illness?

Can reducing inflammation help you to lower the risk of chronic illness?

It will come as no surprise to those that follow a healthy eating plan to hear that wholesome, nutritious food is good for us in a multitude of ways. Eating well can reap dividends when it comes to your digestive health, mental wellbeing and overall vitality, and now a new study has found that excellent nutrition can add another string to its healthy bow.

In the study, commissioned by the ILSI Europe and Diabetes Task Force, a team of academics discovered that nutrition can help in the fight against chronic diseases by controlling levels of inflammation. The researchers noted several different types of inflammation in the body, and analysed just how our choice of food can affect said inflammation.

Eating well can reap dividends when it comes to your digestive health, mental wellbeing and overall vitality.

Inflame in the membrane

The study, published in the British Journal of Nutrition, stated that an inflammation yet to be diagnosed or unresolved may potentially signify the early stages of certain illnesses. It's important, though, to understand that inflammation isn't necessarily a negative thing, as Professor Anne Marie Minihane, of the University of East Anglia, UK, points out:

"Inflammation acts as both a friend and foe, being essential in metabolic regulation, with unresolved low-grade chronic inflammation being a pathological feature of a wide range of chronic conditions including the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases."

With Professor Minihane's words in mind, it seems apparent that either preventing this low-grade inflammation, or at least tightly regulating it, will be hugely beneficial. The researchers state that we can do this simply by eating healthy foods. This is because the inflammatory response is influenced by nutritional status - by this, a lack of vitamin B12, or excess of zinc, for example, will affect such triggers.

The Western diet is on high in fat and sugar - and not particularly good for you.The Western diet is one high in fat and sugar - and not particularly good for you.

Unfortunately, far too many Australians are not eating well. According to statistics released by Roy Morgan Research, a paltry 2 per cent of the population eats the bare minimum serving of fresh fruit and vegetables each day - two of the former and five of the latter - as recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council.

Too much fat, makes you ... fat

In addition to this startling statistic, the ILSI study states that post-prandial inflammation most commonly occurs after a fatty meal high in glucose has been eaten. This can potentially contribute to the early stages of diabetes and heart conditions.

In their analysis of the study, the Nestle Nutrition Institute stated that the Western diet, one rich in fats and sugar, yet low in nutrition, is growing in popularity. Unfortunately, this could be linked to the development of such conditions as allergies, dermatitis and perhaps unsurprisingly, obesity. Therefore, it makes good sense to ensure that your diet is a highly nutritious one.

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Can reducing inflammation help you to lower the risk of chronic illness?

A new study has found that nutrition can have a big say in our ability to stave off chronic illnesses, so eating a good diet is paramount to overall wellbeing.

It will come as no surprise to those that follow a healthy eating plan to hear that wholesome, nutritious food is good for us in a multitude of ways. Eating well can reap dividends when it comes to your digestive health, mental wellbeing and overall vitality, and now a new study has found that excellent nutrition can add another string to its healthy bow.

In the study, commissioned by the ILSI Europe and Diabetes Task Force, a team of academics discovered that nutrition can help in the fight against chronic diseases by controlling levels of inflammation. The researchers noted several different types of inflammation in the body, and analysed just how our choice of food can affect said inflammation.

Eating well can reap dividends when it comes to your digestive health, mental wellbeing and overall vitality.

Inflame in the membrane

The study, published in the British Journal of Nutrition, stated that an inflammation yet to be diagnosed or unresolved may potentially signify the early stages of certain illnesses. It's important, though, to understand that inflammation isn't necessarily a negative thing, as Professor Anne Marie Minihane, of the University of East Anglia, UK, points out:

"Inflammation acts as both a friend and foe, being essential in metabolic regulation, with unresolved low-grade chronic inflammation being a pathological feature of a wide range of chronic conditions including the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases."

With Professor Minihane's words in mind, it seems apparent that either preventing this low-grade inflammation, or at least tightly regulating it, will be hugely beneficial. The researchers state that we can do this simply by eating healthy foods. This is because the inflammatory response is influenced by nutritional status - by this, a lack of vitamin B12, or excess of zinc, for example, will affect such triggers.

The Western diet is on high in fat and sugar - and not particularly good for you.The Western diet is one high in fat and sugar - and not particularly good for you.

Unfortunately, far too many Australians are not eating well. According to statistics released by Roy Morgan Research, a paltry 2 per cent of the population eats the bare minimum serving of fresh fruit and vegetables each day - two of the former and five of the latter - as recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council.

Too much fat, makes you ... fat

In addition to this startling statistic, the ILSI study states that post-prandial inflammation most commonly occurs after a fatty meal high in glucose has been eaten. This can potentially contribute to the early stages of diabetes and heart conditions.

In their analysis of the study, the Nestle Nutrition Institute stated that the Western diet, one rich in fats and sugar, yet low in nutrition, is growing in popularity. Unfortunately, this could be linked to the development of such conditions as allergies, dermatitis and perhaps unsurprisingly, obesity. Therefore, it makes good sense to ensure that your diet is a highly nutritious one.

Can reducing inflammation help you to lower the risk of chronic illness?
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