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Fermented food: Can it lessen the chances of anxiety?

Fermented food: Can it lessen the chances of anxiety?

Anxiety is a condition that can strike each and every one of us at any given time, even in those who are perpetually laid-back and confident with the world around them. According to Anxiety Treatment Australia, one in every seven people was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder within the last year, with women more at risk than men of developing the worrying condition.   

It may come as a surprise to many to learn that anxiety is, in fact, a normal human response to fear and worry, thus affecting even the bravest of people from time to time. However, it's when this anxiety overwhelms us that problems can arise, as the condition takes over our lives and influences our regular day-to-day activities in an adverse fashion.

Indeed, in these cases, we may need to call on the help of a medical professional in order to reach the root of our anxiety issues.

'Good' bacteria bans anxiety 

Though anxiety is known to be caused by a whole host of reasons, a new study has found that the 'good' bacteria - or probiotics - found in fermented food may well be able to curtail the effects of the condition.

Carried out by academics from the College of William and Mary, the research covered some 700 participants - each of whom were asked to fill out a questionnaire detailing their dietary habits with a particular emphasis placed on fermented foods, such as yoghurt.

Additionally, participants completed a secondary questionnaire, centring around personality, in order to build a profile that would reveal such personality traits as neuroticism and paranoia.

A new study has found that the 'good' bacteria - or probiotics - found in fermented food may well be able to curtail the starker effects of the condition.

It was discovered that those who harboured signs of a neurotic personality were more prone to suffer from anxiety - however, on eye-opening  revelation was that eating fermented foods was closely linked to lesser symptoms of the condition.

Mice as nice

Adding weight to these conclusions was a separate study carried out by researchers at McMaster University, Ontario.

Using mice, the academics took bacteria from the gut of bold, near-fearless rodents and administered it to shy, timid ones. Soon, the nervous mice became markedly more confident - and when the brave mice were given 'timid' gut microbes, they soon became shy, too.

What's more, when the researchers changed the probiotics of angry, aggressive mice via their diet, it was only a matter of time before a level of calm came over them.

So what foods can you incorporate into your diet that are full of helpful probiotics? Well, yoghurt is the obvious example, but sauerkraut and tempeh also make the list, so add those to your shopping list for a worry-free gut!

Anxiety can affect each and every one of us.Anxiety can affect each and every one of us.

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Fermented food: Can it lessen the chances of anxiety?

A new study has found that the level of probiotics  - 'good' microbes - in our guts can dictate just how likely we are to fall foul of an anxiety attack.

Anxiety is a condition that can strike each and every one of us at any given time, even in those who are perpetually laid-back and confident with the world around them. According to Anxiety Treatment Australia, one in every seven people was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder within the last year, with women more at risk than men of developing the worrying condition.   

It may come as a surprise to many to learn that anxiety is, in fact, a normal human response to fear and worry, thus affecting even the bravest of people from time to time. However, it's when this anxiety overwhelms us that problems can arise, as the condition takes over our lives and influences our regular day-to-day activities in an adverse fashion.

Indeed, in these cases, we may need to call on the help of a medical professional in order to reach the root of our anxiety issues.

'Good' bacteria bans anxiety 

Though anxiety is known to be caused by a whole host of reasons, a new study has found that the 'good' bacteria - or probiotics - found in fermented food may well be able to curtail the effects of the condition.

Carried out by academics from the College of William and Mary, the research covered some 700 participants - each of whom were asked to fill out a questionnaire detailing their dietary habits with a particular emphasis placed on fermented foods, such as yoghurt.

Additionally, participants completed a secondary questionnaire, centring around personality, in order to build a profile that would reveal such personality traits as neuroticism and paranoia.

A new study has found that the 'good' bacteria - or probiotics - found in fermented food may well be able to curtail the starker effects of the condition.

It was discovered that those who harboured signs of a neurotic personality were more prone to suffer from anxiety - however, on eye-opening  revelation was that eating fermented foods was closely linked to lesser symptoms of the condition.

Mice as nice

Adding weight to these conclusions was a separate study carried out by researchers at McMaster University, Ontario.

Using mice, the academics took bacteria from the gut of bold, near-fearless rodents and administered it to shy, timid ones. Soon, the nervous mice became markedly more confident - and when the brave mice were given 'timid' gut microbes, they soon became shy, too.

What's more, when the researchers changed the probiotics of angry, aggressive mice via their diet, it was only a matter of time before a level of calm came over them.

So what foods can you incorporate into your diet that are full of helpful probiotics? Well, yoghurt is the obvious example, but sauerkraut and tempeh also make the list, so add those to your shopping list for a worry-free gut!

Anxiety can affect each and every one of us.Anxiety can affect each and every one of us.
Fermented food: Can it lessen the chances of anxiety?
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