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How can regular kidney tests help with cardiovascular health?

How can regular kidney tests help with cardiovascular health?

All parts of the human body share a link, no matter how subtle they may seem to us. Even just in the way that our brain sends signals to our arm and hand muscles, enabling us to pick up a lolly and pop it in our mouths, the human body is a fascinating mechanism, connected intricately to perform tasks as a single entity.

Now, a new study has found that taking a regular test to analyse kidney health could help health professionals to assess the risk of cardiovascular issues before they arise. Astonishingly, this could prove just as effective as a blood pressure or cholesterol level test - but how was this discovery come about?  

A link to the future

Firstly, the researchers identified two vital tests that help define kidney complaints, one of which involves testing the blood for creatinine levels and how much of the protein albumin is in the urine. By measuring how much creatinine is present in blood, it can be gauged how effectively the kidneys are filtering this waste product out of the body.

Additionally, although albumin naturally leaks out of the kidney and into the urine, high amounts of it can indicate a problem. But how does this relate back to the health of the heart?

The human body is a fascinating mechanism, connected intricately to perform tasks as a single entity.

One of the researchers behind the study, Dr Kunihiro Matsushita states that the combined information garnered from these two simple tests may help medical staff make informed recommendations to their patients with regards to lifestyle changes, which could involve increased levels of exercise or steps to improve their diet.

"If health care providers have data on kidney damage and kidney function - which they often do - they should be using those data to better understand a patient's risk of cardiovascular disease," said Dr Matsushita.

A kidney-ship with the heart

The researchers analysed information taken from 24 studies, which gave them access to the results of 637,315 patients who had undergone the two kidney tests, with no history of heart trouble. It was discovered that either test, even independent of each other, can markedly improve doctors' chances of predicting heart problems - particularly with the more serious issues that can affect the ticker.

Interestingly, analysing albumin levels was discovered to be, potentially, an even more accurate predictor than studying cholesterol content and blood pressure - even if the patient smokes. 

"This study tells us we could do even better with information that often times we are already collecting," said Dr Matsushita, summing up his findings.

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How can regular kidney tests help with cardiovascular health?

New research has found that, when testing kidney function, the data uncovered can also be used to to predict the chances of future heart problems in a patient.

All parts of the human body share a link, no matter how subtle they may seem to us. Even just in the way that our brain sends signals to our arm and hand muscles, enabling us to pick up a lolly and pop it in our mouths, the human body is a fascinating mechanism, connected intricately to perform tasks as a single entity.

Now, a new study has found that taking a regular test to analyse kidney health could help health professionals to assess the risk of cardiovascular issues before they arise. Astonishingly, this could prove just as effective as a blood pressure or cholesterol level test - but how was this discovery come about?  

A link to the future

Firstly, the researchers identified two vital tests that help define kidney complaints, one of which involves testing the blood for creatinine levels and how much of the protein albumin is in the urine. By measuring how much creatinine is present in blood, it can be gauged how effectively the kidneys are filtering this waste product out of the body.

Additionally, although albumin naturally leaks out of the kidney and into the urine, high amounts of it can indicate a problem. But how does this relate back to the health of the heart?

The human body is a fascinating mechanism, connected intricately to perform tasks as a single entity.

One of the researchers behind the study, Dr Kunihiro Matsushita states that the combined information garnered from these two simple tests may help medical staff make informed recommendations to their patients with regards to lifestyle changes, which could involve increased levels of exercise or steps to improve their diet.

"If health care providers have data on kidney damage and kidney function - which they often do - they should be using those data to better understand a patient's risk of cardiovascular disease," said Dr Matsushita.

A kidney-ship with the heart

The researchers analysed information taken from 24 studies, which gave them access to the results of 637,315 patients who had undergone the two kidney tests, with no history of heart trouble. It was discovered that either test, even independent of each other, can markedly improve doctors' chances of predicting heart problems - particularly with the more serious issues that can affect the ticker.

Interestingly, analysing albumin levels was discovered to be, potentially, an even more accurate predictor than studying cholesterol content and blood pressure - even if the patient smokes. 

"This study tells us we could do even better with information that often times we are already collecting," said Dr Matsushita, summing up his findings.

How can regular kidney tests help with cardiovascular health?
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