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How can your diet help with a thyroid disorder?

How can your diet help with a thyroid disorder?

You may have heard of the thyroid gland - it is one of the many small parts of the human body that plays a pivotal role in keeping people fit and healthy.

Located at the front of the neck, just below the voice box, this small gland is shaped like a capital letter 'H' and works constantly to regulate your body's metabolism.

It does this by taking iodine from the food we eat and transforming it into a hormone called thyroxine, which plays a part in everything from body temperature to brain development.

However, sometimes this hard-working gland produces an insufficient amount of the thyroxine - a condition known as hypothyroidism - leading to a number of health and dietary issues.

Living with hypothyroidism

Women are ten times more likely to suffer from hypothyroidism than men.

The Thyroid Foundation says that around 14 per cent of older people in Australia live with a "clinically relevant thyroid disorder", while an estimated 4 per cent remain undiagnosed.

Thyroid Australia explains that hypothyroidism becomes more common after the age of 40, while women are ten times more likely to suffer from an underactive thyroid gland than men.

An underactive thyroid gland commonly leads to a slower metabolism, and sufferers of the condition should take particular care of their diets.

Everyday Health (EH) recommends reducing the intake of gluten and fatty foods for those with hypothyroidism, as these can interfere with any hormone replacement treatments.

As quoted on EH, Stephanie Lee, from the Boston University School of Medicine, also recommends eating limited amounts of sugary and processed foods.

A thyroid disorder can be easily managed with a well-balanced diet.A thyroid disorder can be easily managed with a well-balanced diet.

Living with hyperthyroidism

While hypothyroidism is underactivity of the thyroid gland, hyperthyroidism is the exact opposite - the gland is excessive in turning iodine-rich foods into thyroxine.

Similarly, this can bring on a number of health issues, which, although treatable, can be reduced along with smart dietary choices.

US medical professional Dr Saul Marcus says there are a number of foods a person with hyperthyroidism can eat to make their condition more manageable. These include:

  • Broccoli
  • Kale
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage
  • Spinach
  • Peanuts and almonds

Dr Marcus recommends avoiding artificial sweeteners and wheat. However, people with either condition should look out for iodine content in the food they consume, to ensure their diet won't interfere with their hormone treatments.

You can easily live a normal healthy life as long as you are conscious of what you consume. Education about your condition will go a long way in maintaining a healthy lifestyle and good wellbeing.

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How can your diet help with a thyroid disorder?

Whether hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, a thyroid disorder is easily manageable with the right diet. Make sure what you're consuming helps your condition.

You may have heard of the thyroid gland - it is one of the many small parts of the human body that plays a pivotal role in keeping people fit and healthy.

Located at the front of the neck, just below the voice box, this small gland is shaped like a capital letter 'H' and works constantly to regulate your body's metabolism.

It does this by taking iodine from the food we eat and transforming it into a hormone called thyroxine, which plays a part in everything from body temperature to brain development.

However, sometimes this hard-working gland produces an insufficient amount of the thyroxine - a condition known as hypothyroidism - leading to a number of health and dietary issues.

Living with hypothyroidism

Women are ten times more likely to suffer from hypothyroidism than men.

The Thyroid Foundation says that around 14 per cent of older people in Australia live with a "clinically relevant thyroid disorder", while an estimated 4 per cent remain undiagnosed.

Thyroid Australia explains that hypothyroidism becomes more common after the age of 40, while women are ten times more likely to suffer from an underactive thyroid gland than men.

An underactive thyroid gland commonly leads to a slower metabolism, and sufferers of the condition should take particular care of their diets.

Everyday Health (EH) recommends reducing the intake of gluten and fatty foods for those with hypothyroidism, as these can interfere with any hormone replacement treatments.

As quoted on EH, Stephanie Lee, from the Boston University School of Medicine, also recommends eating limited amounts of sugary and processed foods.

A thyroid disorder can be easily managed with a well-balanced diet.A thyroid disorder can be easily managed with a well-balanced diet.

Living with hyperthyroidism

While hypothyroidism is underactivity of the thyroid gland, hyperthyroidism is the exact opposite - the gland is excessive in turning iodine-rich foods into thyroxine.

Similarly, this can bring on a number of health issues, which, although treatable, can be reduced along with smart dietary choices.

US medical professional Dr Saul Marcus says there are a number of foods a person with hyperthyroidism can eat to make their condition more manageable. These include:

  • Broccoli
  • Kale
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage
  • Spinach
  • Peanuts and almonds

Dr Marcus recommends avoiding artificial sweeteners and wheat. However, people with either condition should look out for iodine content in the food they consume, to ensure their diet won't interfere with their hormone treatments.

You can easily live a normal healthy life as long as you are conscious of what you consume. Education about your condition will go a long way in maintaining a healthy lifestyle and good wellbeing.

How can your diet help with a thyroid disorder?
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