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How cutting sugary drinks out of your life can decrease the risk of developing diabetes

How cutting sugary drinks out of your life can decrease the risk of developing diabetes

In Australia, it seems we cannot resist the lure of the sugary drink. These sweet beverages, in their brightly-coloured cans, range from fizzy soft drinks through to energy boosters, and the average Aussie is consuming them by the bucketload.

Indeed, according to Rethink Sugary Drink, Australians purchased 1.28 billion litres of sugared carbonated/still drinks in the 12 months leading up to October 2012. The ever-popular cola was the number one choice - with 447 million litres of the stuff gulped down. 

This is bad news when it comes to our health. According to research carried out by the InterAct Consortium at the Imperial College London, drinking 340ml of sugary drink per day - that's less than a standard-sized can - can increase the chances of developing Type 2 diabetes by 22 per cent when compared to drinking just one can per month. 

Not so sweet-as-sugar

There are a staggering 16 teaspoons of sugar in just one 600ml bottle of regular soft drink. With Australia comfortably wedged in the top ten countries, per capita, of soft drink consumers in the world, perhaps it's time to find a healthier alternative to our sugary drink obsession.

Why not consider unsweetened tea or water? A recent study published by Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) has found that drinking a glass of plain tap water or unsweetened tea can notably decrease the chances of developing Type 2 diabetes.

The wide-ranging study found that for each five per cent increase of an individual's total energy intake provided by sugary drinks, the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes could rise by a staggering 18 per cent.

With Australia comfortably wedged in the top ten countries, per capita, of soft drink consumers in the world, perhaps it's time to find a healthier alternative to our sugary drink obsession.

Following up over a period of 11 years, the researchers found that 847 of the participants had been diagnosed with new-onset Type 2 diabetes.These astounding numbers were revealed after 25,000 British men and women, aged between 40 and 79 years, kept a diary of everything that they ate for seven straight days, paying particular attention to type, amount and frequency of consumption.

Sugarcoated facts 

"By using this detailed dietary assessment with a food diary, we were able to study several different types of sugary beverages, such as diet soft drinks and fruit juice, and to examine what would happen if water, unsweetened tea or coffee or artificially sweetened beverages were substituted for sugary drinks," said Dr. Nita Forouhi, of the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge.

The researchers discovered that the risk of developing type 2 diabetes increased exponentially per extra serving per day of sugary drinks and artificially sweetened beverages.

However, by replacing such drinks with a serving of water or unsweetened tea, the risk can be cut by 14 per cent. What's more, drinking water in place of a sweetened milk beverage can reduce the risk by a huge​ 25 per cent.

"These findings add further important evidence to the recommendation from the World Health Organization to limit the intake of free sugars in our diet," said Dr. Forouhi in conclusion.

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How cutting sugary drinks out of your life can decrease the risk of developing diabetes

In Australia, it seems we cannot resist the lure of the sugary drink. These sweet beverages, in their brightly-coloured cans, range from fizzy soft drinks through to energy boosters, and the average Aussie is consuming them by the bucketload.

Indeed, according to Rethink Sugary Drink, Australians purchased 1.28 billion litres of sugared carbonated/still drinks in the 12 months leading up to October 2012. The ever-popular cola was the number one choice - with 447 million litres of the stuff gulped down. 

This is bad news when it comes to our health. According to research carried out by the InterAct Consortium at the Imperial College London, drinking 340ml of sugary drink per day - that's less than a standard-sized can - can increase the chances of developing Type 2 diabetes by 22 per cent when compared to drinking just one can per month. 

Not so sweet-as-sugar

There are a staggering 16 teaspoons of sugar in just one 600ml bottle of regular soft drink. With Australia comfortably wedged in the top ten countries, per capita, of soft drink consumers in the world, perhaps it's time to find a healthier alternative to our sugary drink obsession.

Why not consider unsweetened tea or water? A recent study published by Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) has found that drinking a glass of plain tap water or unsweetened tea can notably decrease the chances of developing Type 2 diabetes.

The wide-ranging study found that for each five per cent increase of an individual's total energy intake provided by sugary drinks, the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes could rise by a staggering 18 per cent.

With Australia comfortably wedged in the top ten countries, per capita, of soft drink consumers in the world, perhaps it's time to find a healthier alternative to our sugary drink obsession.

Following up over a period of 11 years, the researchers found that 847 of the participants had been diagnosed with new-onset Type 2 diabetes.These astounding numbers were revealed after 25,000 British men and women, aged between 40 and 79 years, kept a diary of everything that they ate for seven straight days, paying particular attention to type, amount and frequency of consumption.

Sugarcoated facts 

"By using this detailed dietary assessment with a food diary, we were able to study several different types of sugary beverages, such as diet soft drinks and fruit juice, and to examine what would happen if water, unsweetened tea or coffee or artificially sweetened beverages were substituted for sugary drinks," said Dr. Nita Forouhi, of the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge.

The researchers discovered that the risk of developing type 2 diabetes increased exponentially per extra serving per day of sugary drinks and artificially sweetened beverages.

However, by replacing such drinks with a serving of water or unsweetened tea, the risk can be cut by 14 per cent. What's more, drinking water in place of a sweetened milk beverage can reduce the risk by a huge​ 25 per cent.

"These findings add further important evidence to the recommendation from the World Health Organization to limit the intake of free sugars in our diet," said Dr. Forouhi in conclusion.

How cutting sugary drinks out of your life can decrease the risk of developing diabetes
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