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New research shows vitamin B may have benefits for fertility

New research shows vitamin B may have benefits for fertility

New research had suggested that B-group vitamins may have an added benefit for female health: They may help counteract negative effects on fertility posed by exposure to DDT, a currently banned pesticide that was once used widely for the purposes of malaria prevention. But what is DDT, is it still present in the ecosystem, and how might vitamin B help remedy its side effects?

DDT: A once-popular insecticide

DDT was widely used during the World War II area to help curb the spread of malaria. An effective insecticide, DDT helped to keep mosquito populations in check. It began to be used as an insecticide in other capacities, and was hailed for its ability to remain in the environment even after its initial application.

However, this staying power proved to be negative for the environment as a whole. In addition to harming bird reproduction cycles, it became classified as a carcinogen - a substance that is proven to have the potential to cause cancer. As such, DDT was banned in Australia in 1987.

The after effects of DDT use

Unfortunately, what was once considered one of DDT's selling points - its ability to remain in the environment after its initial application - has become a major drawback. Levels of DDT remain present in the environment, and are thought to have negative impacts on health.

One suspected after effect of DDT is an impact on fertility. According to a release by the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, DDT is linked with reproductive problems in humans.

New study shows B-group vitamins may help

However, there is hope on the horizon for those who have been exposed to DDT. A new study by Johns Hopkins researchers has found that supplementing with B-group vitamins could counteract the negative effects of DDT.

In the study, researchers monitored the fertility and conception rates in 291 women who had been exposed to DDT. They monitored urine samples on such a regular basis that they were able to detect early miscarriages. They found that the risk of miscarriage was higher in women who weren't supplementing with vitamin B. They also noted that non-supplementing women took about twice as long to conceive a pregnancy.

"This study tells us that improved nutrition may modify the toxic effects of DDT, by better preparing the body to cope with environmental toxins and stressors," said Dr. Xiaobin Wang, MD, who led the study. "We have shown that women with high levels of DDT who also had high levels of B vitamins had a better chance of getting and staying pregnant than those were deficient in those vitamins."

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New research shows vitamin B may have benefits for fertility

New research had suggested that B-group vitamins may have an added benefit for female health: They may help counteract negative effects on fertility posed by exposure to DDT, a currently banned pesticide that was once used widely for the purposes of malaria prevention. But what is DDT, is it still present in the ecosystem, and how might vitamin B help remedy its side effects?

DDT: A once-popular insecticide

DDT was widely used during the World War II area to help curb the spread of malaria. An effective insecticide, DDT helped to keep mosquito populations in check. It began to be used as an insecticide in other capacities, and was hailed for its ability to remain in the environment even after its initial application.

However, this staying power proved to be negative for the environment as a whole. In addition to harming bird reproduction cycles, it became classified as a carcinogen - a substance that is proven to have the potential to cause cancer. As such, DDT was banned in Australia in 1987.

The after effects of DDT use

Unfortunately, what was once considered one of DDT's selling points - its ability to remain in the environment after its initial application - has become a major drawback. Levels of DDT remain present in the environment, and are thought to have negative impacts on health.

One suspected after effect of DDT is an impact on fertility. According to a release by the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, DDT is linked with reproductive problems in humans.

New study shows B-group vitamins may help

However, there is hope on the horizon for those who have been exposed to DDT. A new study by Johns Hopkins researchers has found that supplementing with B-group vitamins could counteract the negative effects of DDT.

In the study, researchers monitored the fertility and conception rates in 291 women who had been exposed to DDT. They monitored urine samples on such a regular basis that they were able to detect early miscarriages. They found that the risk of miscarriage was higher in women who weren't supplementing with vitamin B. They also noted that non-supplementing women took about twice as long to conceive a pregnancy.

"This study tells us that improved nutrition may modify the toxic effects of DDT, by better preparing the body to cope with environmental toxins and stressors," said Dr. Xiaobin Wang, MD, who led the study. "We have shown that women with high levels of DDT who also had high levels of B vitamins had a better chance of getting and staying pregnant than those were deficient in those vitamins."

New research shows vitamin B may have benefits for fertility
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