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New study reveals B3 vitamin could be effective for preventing hearing loss

New study reveals B3 vitamin could be effective for preventing hearing loss

As we age, our aural health often declines. Hearing loss is a natural part of ageing, but it is often sped up by exposure to loud noises. This doesn't just impact rock music fans, either - according to a study published in the US National Library of Medicine (NLM), teachers experience occupational hearing loss as a result of being exposed to elevated noise levels throughout their careers.

However, new research has found that nicotinamide riboside, a B-group vitamin, may help protect against hearing loss.

What is nicotinamide riboside?

According to the NLM, nicotinamide riboside is a B3 vitamin. It's only found in foods in trace amounts and is most frequently obtained through milk and beer. It's known to be neuroprotective, which may explain the findings of a new study that showed it can protect against hearing loss.

Study showcases the aural-protective effects of nicotinamide riboside

New research from Weill Cornell Medical College in New York examined the effects of nicotinamide riboside on hearing in mice. They found that supplementing with this nutrient helped stave off hearing loss as the mice aged. It did this by protecting the synapses that transmit messages from the cochlea, which picks up information from sound waves, and the brain, which interprets the information and allows us to perceive sound.

Unlike some other substances that aren't practical for use in medicine, nicotinamide riboside can be taken orally and is easily absorbed by the body, making it a good candidate for medical applications, according to the study.

The researchers still have some work to do in figuring out how the effects of nicotinamide riboside will play out in humans, but the new light shed by the study bodes well for the future of hearing loss treatments.

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New study reveals B3 vitamin could be effective for preventing hearing loss

A new study found that a B3 vitamin called nicotinamide riboside may have protective benefits for aural health and hearing loss.

As we age, our aural health often declines. Hearing loss is a natural part of ageing, but it is often sped up by exposure to loud noises. This doesn't just impact rock music fans, either - according to a study published in the US National Library of Medicine (NLM), teachers experience occupational hearing loss as a result of being exposed to elevated noise levels throughout their careers.

However, new research has found that nicotinamide riboside, a B-group vitamin, may help protect against hearing loss.

What is nicotinamide riboside?

According to the NLM, nicotinamide riboside is a B3 vitamin. It's only found in foods in trace amounts and is most frequently obtained through milk and beer. It's known to be neuroprotective, which may explain the findings of a new study that showed it can protect against hearing loss.

Study showcases the aural-protective effects of nicotinamide riboside

New research from Weill Cornell Medical College in New York examined the effects of nicotinamide riboside on hearing in mice. They found that supplementing with this nutrient helped stave off hearing loss as the mice aged. It did this by protecting the synapses that transmit messages from the cochlea, which picks up information from sound waves, and the brain, which interprets the information and allows us to perceive sound.

Unlike some other substances that aren't practical for use in medicine, nicotinamide riboside can be taken orally and is easily absorbed by the body, making it a good candidate for medical applications, according to the study.

The researchers still have some work to do in figuring out how the effects of nicotinamide riboside will play out in humans, but the new light shed by the study bodes well for the future of hearing loss treatments.

New study reveals B3 vitamin could be effective for preventing hearing loss
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