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Watching out for allergies in your baby

Watching out for allergies in your baby

There are so many foods, plants and other various substances out there that it's no wonder so many of us have some form of allergy or another. Allergies can occur with pretty much anything, healthy foods or not, and with things that we are constantly exposed to.

It's most important to watch out for allergic reactions in young ones, especially babies - they can develop due to family history, or that their bodies are sensitive and inexperienced to processing all sorts of allergens around.

Don't let that trick you into thinking that once you've passed childhood, you're safe from developing allergies too. It can hit anyone of all ages, and sometimes, are so mild that people don't even consider or notice it.

Babies can be more vulnerable to the same allergies as you so keep an eye out for changes.Babies can be more vulnerable to the same allergies as you so keep an eye out for changes.

Some common allergens

Allergies can be genetic, but that isn't always necessarily the case. It's always of vital importance that you tell any medical professional of known allergies, whether big or small, so they can properly assess your child, both pre- or post-birth. The Victorian government's Better Health Channel (BHC) states that 60 per cent of allergies are usually exhibited within the first year of a child's life.

Health Direct (HD) explains that if you have a family history of any atopic conditions - that is, asthma, hayfever and eczema, it is more likely that your child will develop it too. The allergens associated with these conditions are typically pollen and dust.

However, it's not always the case that your child may have the same allergies as you, so care should always be taken when introducing new foods to their diet. HD explains that you do so only after six months, when a baby is being weaned out of liquid food and onto solids and has a stronger immune system. These are the most common food allergens:

  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Wheat
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Fish
  • Shellfish
  • Peanuts

The Baby Center states that around two per cent of Australian babies have a milk allergy, while eight per cent are allergic to eggs. The latter usually resolves as the child ages, and both are unlikely to be severe reactions. With peanut products, three per cent of babies are adverse, which can sometimes be more serious.

It's of importance to note that an allergy is not the same as an intolerance. Allergies are your body's immune system fighting and producing antibodies to ward off a substance that it deems harmful to your body. An intolerance is a difficulty with your digestive system processing the necessary nutrients and energy from a type of food, and can be treated with health supplements if needed.

Hayfever symptoms are usually aggravated between season changes so be prepared.Hay fever symptoms are usually aggravated when a season changes so be prepared.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction

When introducing new foods to babies, keep an eye out for any changes. Common symptoms, as explained by BHC, are:

  • Rashes or hives on the skin
  • Swelling
  • Sneezing and runny nose
  • Teary, itchy and/or red eyes
  • Wheezing, coughing or laboured breathing
  • Nausea and vomiting

The most crucial to be aware of is breathing, especially as young babies aren't able to express their discomfort as well. Fortunately, most reactions are mild, but any symptoms should get checked out by a health professional.

Adults can develop more than mild allergies to substances they've been exposed to multiple times in the past.

Also, these symptoms may not only exhibit in babies - adults can develop more than mild allergies to substances they've been exposed to multiple times in the past.

To combat reactions, it depends on the type of allergy. Eczema and rashes can usually be treated with a soothing cream that has moisturising properties. Sometimes, more serious rashes are prescribed steroid creams, which can bring great relief to an intense itch or dryness.

There are also plenty of other commonly used and safe to ingest medications. Antihistamines, for example, are readily available for hay fever symptoms. Your doctor can advise the best course for you or your child.

All in all, many people can grow out of an allergy, or learn to live with them. Sometimes, it's about making smart choices (choosing nut-free foods), but they're not uncommon, and can be treated so that they don't interfere with a healthy lifestyle.

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Watching out for allergies in your baby

Do you know what the symptoms of allergic reactions are, and how to keep an eye out for them in your baby? Here, we explain a few facts and misconceptions.

There are so many foods, plants and other various substances out there that it's no wonder so many of us have some form of allergy or another. Allergies can occur with pretty much anything, healthy foods or not, and with things that we are constantly exposed to.

It's most important to watch out for allergic reactions in young ones, especially babies - they can develop due to family history, or that their bodies are sensitive and inexperienced to processing all sorts of allergens around.

Don't let that trick you into thinking that once you've passed childhood, you're safe from developing allergies too. It can hit anyone of all ages, and sometimes, are so mild that people don't even consider or notice it.

Babies can be more vulnerable to the same allergies as you so keep an eye out for changes.Babies can be more vulnerable to the same allergies as you so keep an eye out for changes.

Some common allergens

Allergies can be genetic, but that isn't always necessarily the case. It's always of vital importance that you tell any medical professional of known allergies, whether big or small, so they can properly assess your child, both pre- or post-birth. The Victorian government's Better Health Channel (BHC) states that 60 per cent of allergies are usually exhibited within the first year of a child's life.

Health Direct (HD) explains that if you have a family history of any atopic conditions - that is, asthma, hayfever and eczema, it is more likely that your child will develop it too. The allergens associated with these conditions are typically pollen and dust.

However, it's not always the case that your child may have the same allergies as you, so care should always be taken when introducing new foods to their diet. HD explains that you do so only after six months, when a baby is being weaned out of liquid food and onto solids and has a stronger immune system. These are the most common food allergens:

  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Wheat
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Fish
  • Shellfish
  • Peanuts

The Baby Center states that around two per cent of Australian babies have a milk allergy, while eight per cent are allergic to eggs. The latter usually resolves as the child ages, and both are unlikely to be severe reactions. With peanut products, three per cent of babies are adverse, which can sometimes be more serious.

It's of importance to note that an allergy is not the same as an intolerance. Allergies are your body's immune system fighting and producing antibodies to ward off a substance that it deems harmful to your body. An intolerance is a difficulty with your digestive system processing the necessary nutrients and energy from a type of food, and can be treated with health supplements if needed.

Hayfever symptoms are usually aggravated between season changes so be prepared.Hay fever symptoms are usually aggravated when a season changes so be prepared.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction

When introducing new foods to babies, keep an eye out for any changes. Common symptoms, as explained by BHC, are:

  • Rashes or hives on the skin
  • Swelling
  • Sneezing and runny nose
  • Teary, itchy and/or red eyes
  • Wheezing, coughing or laboured breathing
  • Nausea and vomiting

The most crucial to be aware of is breathing, especially as young babies aren't able to express their discomfort as well. Fortunately, most reactions are mild, but any symptoms should get checked out by a health professional.

Adults can develop more than mild allergies to substances they've been exposed to multiple times in the past.

Also, these symptoms may not only exhibit in babies - adults can develop more than mild allergies to substances they've been exposed to multiple times in the past.

To combat reactions, it depends on the type of allergy. Eczema and rashes can usually be treated with a soothing cream that has moisturising properties. Sometimes, more serious rashes are prescribed steroid creams, which can bring great relief to an intense itch or dryness.

There are also plenty of other commonly used and safe to ingest medications. Antihistamines, for example, are readily available for hay fever symptoms. Your doctor can advise the best course for you or your child.

All in all, many people can grow out of an allergy, or learn to live with them. Sometimes, it's about making smart choices (choosing nut-free foods), but they're not uncommon, and can be treated so that they don't interfere with a healthy lifestyle.

Watching out for allergies in your baby
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